POP! - a pop art exhibition at Christies, London / by Shaun Armstrong

Catalogue - When Britain Went PopAlways been drawn to Pop Art in one form or another, I guess as it's a visual touchpoint for the 1960's - a period of challenge, experimentation and free thinking after the austere, post-war 50's. Whether that's bold and iconic British music and fashion via Liverpool and Carnaby Street, cool machines like the Jaguar E-Type, Ford Mustang and GT-40, Saturn V rocket or SR-71 Lockheed Blackbird; icons like JFK and the Rat Pack or Sean Connery as James Bond…the sixties rocked, or rather, swung. What a treat then to stumble, quite literally, across an exciting exhibition of iconic artworks on display at the swanky Christie's in Upper Bond Street entitled "When Britain Went Pop". For the first time in a long tome pieces by 18 artists including Peter Blake (of Sgt Pepper cover fame), Derek Boshier, David Hockney, Eduardo Paolozzi (not Enrico Palazzo from Naked Gun ;) and the quite achingly beautiful Pauline Boty, la belle de pop-art who died tragically at the age of 28 in 1966, had been brought together.

After just checking this wasn't some private sale-viewing space where they expected me to pony up a large amount of cash, I wandered around the three expansive floors, by myself mainly (aside from a good number of stern looking security guards, suitably juxtaposed in suits, ties and starch against the wild, colourful abandon of the works they were minding) drinking in the vibrant works.

An added bonus was a side room showing the 1962 film by Ken Russell "Monitor - Pop Goes The Easel" a very artistically shot and slightly trippy documentary about four of the artists, their work and the "swinging scene" which I enjoyed as it featured many of the artworks on show as they were being made in the studio and/or in their 60's context with the artists which really added impact and connection when looking at them again close up and personal. Worth a watch when you have 45 mins to spare - link below.

Fearful of being ejected onto the street should I try to photograph the works, as is the threat with most (usually photographic, ironically) exhibitions I've been to, I took none until on the way out I asked to use my phone to photograph a statement on the wall about the pop art genre and to my surprise was told I could take photos, as long as I didn't use flash. Thanks to Christies for supporting the spirit of creating art from art, I went back around with my Fuji. I've a few personal projects on the boil artistically and this was a great inspiration.

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www.christies.com

Film Pop Goes The Easel - Ken Russell 1962